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What Does It Mean to Be A Teen With Borderline Personality Traits?

Posted on August 20, 2015 in Teen Mental Health, Teens

What Does It Mean to Be A Teen With Borderline Personality Traits?

Borderline personality disorder, also known as BPD, is a mental illness categorized as a mood disorder. Someone with BPD typically has unstable moods, difficulty with relationships and erratic behaviors. If you think these characteristics of the disorder sound like your average teenager, you aren’t wrong, and this is a big problem when it comes to diagnosing troubled adolescents. Many teens display worrying signs of BPD, but doctors are often hesitant to make a diagnosis. It can be hard to distinguish between the disorder and the ups and downs of adolescence. The result is that some teens are labeled as having borderline personality traits. What does this mean for teens and their parents?

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teens borderline personality disorder

Posted on December 2, 2013 in Teen Mental Health

Pioneering Study Finds Precursors for BPD in Adolescents

Borderline personality disorder is a serious mental health condition characterized by behaviors and emotions best described as impulsive and unstable. Those with BPD may have strong fears of abandonment and have difficulty controlling their anger. This leads to rocky relationships with others. Inner insecurities may cause them to take impulsive actions or do what is known as splitting – view someone as either all good or all bad. It’s not uncommon for those with BPD to also resort to self-mutilation or become suicidal.

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borderline personality disorder among teens

Posted on April 23, 2013 in Teen Mental Health

Borderline Personality Disorder Precursors in Teenagers

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a psychiatric disorder that involves such personality-related problems as diminished self-awareness, unpredictable moods and a marked tendency toward impulsive behavior. As is true with other personality disorders, mental health professionals generally avoid diagnosing BPD in teenagers and younger children because people in these age groups are still going through important phases of mental development. However, according to the results of a study published in 2011 by researchers from the University of Houston, teenagers who later receive a BPD diagnosis as adults consistently develop a precursor to the disorder that manifests as an inability to accurately “mentalize,” or interpret the thoughts and intentions of others.

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